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NCFM Adviser Gordon Finley, PhD, quoted in article about Fatherhood

September 4, 2015
By

man and boyNCFM NOTE ON FATHERHOOD: Young fathers have a much higher early death rate than do men who become fathers later in life. There is no mention in the article about whether non custodial dads whose children are kept from them, whose children are alienated against them, and are paying onerous child support and onerous alimony might give to their early death. What do you think?

How Long Should You Wait for Fatherhood?

Research suggests holding off until after age 25.

By their late 20s, most men are done with school, established in their careers, financially stable and have a clearer sense of identity, making them more equipped for fatherhood.

By Samantha Costa + More

Some view fatherhood as an end to independence. A time when beer bottles are traded for baby bottles and Netflix nights are eclipsed by diaper changes and late-night feedings. It might feel like your life has changed forever, and it will. But how young is too young to become a father?

New research published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health suggests that becoming a dad before age 25 could have serious health consequences: an untimely death in middle age. Men who became fathers earlier in life were more likely to have poor health and die younger than men who delayed fatherhood until ages 30 to 44, the study found.

The researchers examined more than 30,500 men born between 1940 and 1950 who became fathers by age 45. Of those, 15 percent had their first child by age 22; 29 percent had theirs by ages 22 to 24; 18 percent by ages 25 to 26; 19 percent by ages 27 to 29; and 19 percent by ages 30 to 44.

The research team also looked at other factors, such as the men’s level of education, geographic location, marital status and number of children. During the 10-year follow-up period, 1 in 20 dads died. Ischemic heart disease was to blame for 21 percent of the deaths, while alcohol-related diseases accounted for 16 percent.

You can read the rest of the article here: http://health.usnews.com/health-news/health-wellness/articles/2015/09/04/how-long-should-you-wait-for-fatherhood

national coalition for menFatherhood is a great experience for those given the opportunity.

One Response to NCFM Adviser Gordon Finley, PhD, quoted in article about Fatherhood

  1. Charles Jackson-Smythe on September 11, 2015 at 3:40 AM

    We are particularly interested in any statistics or anecdotal information about the high levels of suicides in men in post divorce situations. We believe that men get depressed and give up hope as a result of the decisions of secret family courts being misled by wives who tell lies and are believed above what the husband says and the ridiculous state of affairs that seem to dictate that women only have hormones and must be the residence carer for any children. These attitudes are totally sexist and corrupts the fundamentals of an Society where ALL are equal. We at http://www.suffragents.org are having a ‘Free to Attend’ Convention in Bedford, UK on March 12th 2016 to raise awareness about the ‘Rights of Men’ and the women and children who love them.

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