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NCFM International Coordinator Carl Augustsson explains his United Nations Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Men

February 12, 2019
By

discrimination against men

NCFM NOTE: Carl has been our International Coordinator for several years. He and his family live outside of the United States. One of Carl’s goals is to travel to all countries and he’s been to almost all of them. Carl is a university professor, a PhD in Political Science and International affairs and is working on his fourth Masters Degree. He is fluent in many languages and has citizenship in three countries. You may not agree with all the Convention’s 30 points but they clearly have been well thought through, are grounded in fact and solid logic, and we compiled by someone who has traveled extensively and seen first hand the broad-based discriminatory treatment of males. Aside from which, during his travels, he makes concerted efforts to promote the Convention and meet with policy makers who may be able to help. This is a gargantuan effort and we thank Carl profusely for his work.

 

NCFM International Coordinator Carl Augustsson explains his United Nations Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Men

 

national coalition for men

 

3 Responses to NCFM International Coordinator Carl Augustsson explains his United Nations Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Men

  1. Dr. Philip Hadlock on February 25, 2019 at 9:10 AM

    This is an excellent initiative and a good start, but it really needs to extend even further. Countries where male suicide rates far exceed those of women–which is the case in most if not all U.N. countries–need to include in their public health and welfare systems specific provisions for providing support to prevent the conditions that lead to male suicide. Further, it is not acceptable that U.N. countries close their eyes to soaring rates of male homelessness, which in many cases are four or more times higher than rates of female homelessness. In addition to revising sentencing guidelines to reduce gender disparities, the sheer disproportion of the prisoner populations in U.N. countries needs to be evaluated and addressed. U.N. countries whose prisoner populations are well in excess of 50% male should be expected to examine the conditions that are creating the disparity and commit to introducing measures that will reduce them. It is not reasonable to pursue measures ensuring gender parity in women’s opportunity to pursue career success in all arenas while disregarding the fact that the same disparities in the system have led to unbelievably high rates of incarceration for men.

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